2007-2008 Schlanger Fellow – Masako Tominaga

Masako Tominaga

Texas A&M University

Determination of Volcanostratigraphy of ODP/IODP Hole 1256D: Core-log Integration of Oceanic Crust Formed at a Superfast Spreading Rate





fellow-tominagaFor my fellowship research I will construct an unbiased quantitative volcanostratigraphy of ODP/IODP Hole 1256D on the East Pacific Rise. Incomplete core recovery makes the volcanostratigraphy extremely important for understanding processes of crustal construction, magmatism, and to estimating downhole seawater recharge flux that can indicate evolution of the oceanic crust and its alteration processes in the archetypical fast-spreading oceanic crust at Site 1256. First, I will determine a revised volcanostratigraphy by qualitative integration of recovered cores with downhole logs. Next I will construct an unbiased quantitative lithostratigraphy using these data and a new artificial neural network algorithm. Comparing shipboard, qualitative core-log integration and new, quantitative volcanostratigraphy will enable stratigraphic models to be evaluated. My technique will be applicable to other igneous basement holes where logging data are available making this study highly relevant to and valuable for future IODP drilling.




Using field techniques and physics to tackle complicated scientific problems has always interested me, especially those problems related to offshore drilling and marine geophysics and geology. After growing up in Kamakura, a historic seaside town in Japan, I attended Waseda University, also in Japan. In 2002, I received my B.E. degree in Petroleum Engineering, focusing on in situ rock mechanics around boreholes. In 2005, I completed a M.S. degree in marine geophysics and geomagnetism at Texas A&M University, where I studied under the supervision of Will Sager in the Department of Oceanography. Dr. Sager’s understanding of my cultural background, respect for my independent research, and his involvement in ocean drilling have opened many doors for me. For receiving this fellowship, I am truly thankful to Drs. Teagle, Alt, and Sager for their guidance.